HIIT THE TRACK FOR THIS STRENGTH & RUNNING HIGH INTENSITY WORKOUT

Welcome to the latest edition of 'Workout Wednesday' when each week I share a new strength training for runners or running workout. This week I am combining the best of both worlds for a workout that can be split up and done on two separate days or combined all together and done at once. 

You'll need to find a track with stadium stairs and a bench. Are you ready? It's a doozy. 

Always warm up before beginning any workout. Try this dynamic warmup for runners to start. 

HIIT THE STAIRS SQUAT WORKOUT

Part one of this workout uses the stadium stairs with squat variations. It includes a lateral side step squat, a plyometric jump squat and a split squat, three moves that will help you build the strength you'll need to improve in running. You will complete the circuit below with six to eight reps of each exercise, then run a set of stairs. Complete three to four rounds. Never rush through the strength moves, they should be done with precision and intention. 

 HIIT THE STAIRS SQUAT WORKOUT. SAVE TO YOUR FAVORITE PINTEREST BOARD FOR LATER

HIIT THE STAIRS SQUAT WORKOUT. SAVE TO YOUR FAVORITE PINTEREST BOARD FOR LATER

HIIT THE TRACK BENCH WORKOUT

The second part of our workout can either be performed immediately after the stair workout or on another day. This work out includes a step-up to balance, an incline pushup, and a tricep dip. Most runners would benefit from balance training. Upper body strength is important for core stability and to power your stride. Complete six to eight reps of each exercise in a circuit, then run a lap around the track (1/4 mile) at a moderate intensity. Complete three to four rounds.

 HIIT THE TRACK BENCH WORKOUT. SAVE TO YOUR FAVORITE PINTEREST BOARD FOR LATER.

HIIT THE TRACK BENCH WORKOUT. SAVE TO YOUR FAVORITE PINTEREST BOARD FOR LATER.

This is a high-intensity workout and should be performed no more than two times per week for most athletes. Allow adequate rest between hard workouts (rest days or extremely easy-effort days). Our bodies adapt (grow stronger and faster) during the rest period after our workout, not during your workout itself. If we don't allow proper time for recovery we will not see the full benefit of our hard work and can risk overtraining or injury. With high-intensity workouts, less is more. Got it? Good.

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