Fit to Run: Sprint Interval Pyramid Treadmill Workout

Welcome to the latest edition of Workout Wednesday! We are moving into month three of my Fit to Run strength for runners program. If you've missed any of it so far, you can dive into the archives or click here to download a PDF of all the workouts in month one and two including a 5 minute hip strength workout for when you don't have time for anything else. 

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Today we are doing a sprint interval pyramid running workout. This can be done on the treadmill or on the track or street with a timer. When I'm outside, I use the GymBoss to time my intervals.

I'm in Texas and it's freakin' hot and humid outside all hours of the day and night so I've been focusing on indoor workouts on the treadmill. When the weather cools down I'll be as fast as the wind from all this speed work. 

The great thing about these running workouts is that they are quick and efficient. You can get in and out of the gym with a focused speed workout. They are tough, but short. 

SPRINT INTERVAL PYRAMID TREADMILL WORKOUT

HOW FAST SHOULD I RUN?

You decide your paces based on your own fitness level. Please never follow some arbitrary pace because someone on the internet told you to. Your fitness level is your fitness level. What is a challenging interval pace for one person may be too easy for another. What is an easy pace for one person may push another person to injury. I am very hesitant about assigning paces in blog posts, even as examples. You need to determine your own work paces and recovery paces based on your fitness level. If you work with me as your running coach I can assign specific paces to you based on your fitness level and goals.

RATE OF PERCEIVED EXERTION CHART

A great way to determine an appropriate pace is by using the RPE or rate or perceived exertion chart, which I cover in more detail in this post. Do some experimenting. Decide what paces work best for you at each interval. If you ran the interval and feel like you could've pushed a little faster, increase the pace next time. If you went out too fast and couldn't complete the whole interval, then next time start out a little slower. 

The beauty is that when you repeat the workout over several weeks and months, you will find that your hard effort pace will get faster over time. 

THE WORKOUT

Warm up for three minutes by jogging at an easy pace
Increase your pace to run at a hard effort for 30 seconds
Recover for two minutes by jogging at an easy pace
Increase your pace and run at a hard effort for 45 seconds
Recover for two minutes by jogging at an easy pace
Increase your pace and run at a hard effort for 60 seconds
Recover for two minutes by jogging at an easy pace
Increase your pace and run at a hard effort for 60 seconds
Recover for two minutes by jogging at an easy pace
Increase your pace and run at a hard effort for 45 seconds
Recover for two minutes by jogging at an easy pace
Increase your pace to run at a hard effort for 30 seconds
Cool down as long as you need

RECOVERY

For most people intense workouts like this one should be limited to 1-3 times per week. Always allow rest and recovery days in between hard workouts. If you do this workout on a Monday, schedule your next intense workout on Wednesday or Thursday. The body adapts (gets stronger and faster) during rest, not during the actual workout, so always allow the body enough time for recovery for best results. 

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Coach Lea

I am a NASM personal trainer and RRCA adult distance running coach that specializes in strength training for runners. I offer in-person training in Fort Worth, TX in the Shredshedonline training and nutrition coaching. If you are interested in coaching, please contact me. Have questions? I'd love to help. 

While I am a certified personal trainer and nutrition coach, I am not your personal trainer and nutrition coach. Since I don't know your exercise abilities, injury background or medical history, please see your doctor before beginning any new exercise or diet program. This is an opinion blog. No information in this blog is intended to be taken as medical advice or prescription. Please see your doctor and/or registered dietitian for any health concerns.