5 RUNNING SHOE MISTAKES YOU MAY BE MAKING

Hi, friends! Are you making any of these running shoe mistakes? Running shoes can be expensive so you want to make sure you get the most out of your investment. Don't make these mistakes with your running shoes.

YOU RUN, TAKE FITNESS BOOT CAMP AND GO TO ZUMBA IN YOUR RUNNING SHOES

Running shoes are made specifically for running. When you run you move in a single plane--forward. Running shoes are designed to support you only in forward movements. The problem is that if you go to fitness boot camp or zumba class and wear your running shoes you are not protected for the lateral side-to-side moves. Running shoes aren't designed for that and you open yourself up to potential injury. Buy a pair of cross trainers for your fitness classes and save your running shoes for running. 

YOU BUY THE SAME SIZE AS YOUR DRESS SHOES

Running shoes should be bought 1/2 size to 1 full size bigger than your street shoes. You should have about a thumb width space empty in the toe box.

The reason for this is that your feet tend to swell when you run and you need a bit more room to keep your toes from hitting the end of the shoe, which doesn't matter so much in an everyday shoe, but matters a lot in a running shoe. Give those tootsies room to breathe. 

YOU DON'T TIE THEM FOR ANKLE SUPPORT

Ever wonder what that extra hole was for in your running shoes? Use it to tie your shoes for better ankle support. Check out my quick video where I show you how. It is easy and makes a big difference in how your shoes fit.

 

YOU ALSO WEAR THEM AS CASUAL SHOES

You probably have noticed that running shoes can be expensive. They have a limited lifespan and every step wears away at the tread and shock absorption. Save your running shoes for running and buy a pair or less expensive tennies for walking around in. 

YOU DON'T REPLACE THEM EVERY 300-500 MILES

After 300-500 miles you may start to notice the tread is wearing down and the shock absorption pads are starting to crush down. It's a good idea to make note of when you bought your shoes in your training journal or even with a sharpie on your shoes. Aches and pains out of the blue could be a sign that you need to replace your shoes. Keep a close watch on your milage and pay attention to the tread. 300-500 miles is an estimate, if you run on rough terrain you may need to replace sooner.

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Any questions? Ask in the comments or join in on the conversation in my new series, Ask the Trainer, to have your question featured in a future blog post. I'd love to help. 

Coach Lea

I am a NASM personal trainer and RRCA adult distance running coach that specializes in strength training for runners. I offer in-person training in the Shredshed, online training and Fit to Run bootcamps. If you are interested in a more in-depth running or strength training plan, please contact me. Have questions? I'd love to help. 

While I am a certified personal trainer, I am not your personal trainer. Since I don't know your exercise abilities, injury background or medical history, please see your doctor before beginning any new exercise program.